Flat Front Drum Shield

Once you are safe and secure knowing there is a Drum Shield of thick plexiglass between the lead musicians and the drummer, the most important thing to ensure is that the drummer can clearly see directions being communicated.  Let’s face it drummers aren’t going to keep their own time or remember an entire sets worth of directions just because they were rehearsed over and over.  Constant supervision and communication is the name of the game.  How do you ensure that?

Flat Front Drum Shield

A big mistake made with a lot of cheap Drum Shields is not having a flat front (Of course the Winning Drum Shield is an exception).  This is detrimental in two ways:

  1. There is a seem in the drummers vision, this can cause the lead singer in his stage prancing to enter a blind spot where the drummer can’t see him.  And we all know not being able to see the lead singer, no matter who you are, is about the worst thing in the world.
  2. The angled panels can cause visual distortion (not the sweet tube distortion we so crave from the lead guitarist’s holy grail tone) which could lead to a misinterpretation of a signal, with potentially fatal  results.  Never fear the answer is here.
Drum Shield on a riser with a flat front.

Ooooh so smooth

Here we have crystal clear unobstructed vision.  If the lead guitarist decides his artistic integrity would be compromised if he didn’t continue to solo for another 12 bars, instead of ending where he rehearsed, or where the song calls for it.  A quick forward roll of the finger is all that’s needed to tell the drummer, “Do that again, the music demands I remain in the spotlight for another few minutes”.

Drum Shield on a riser with a flat front.

Notice all seems are kept on the sides possibly obstructing the view of other “support” musicians. But who cares.

The flat front drum shield actually address the largest shortfall of the Winning Drum Shield.  Namely that with 360 visibility the drummer can be distracted by the other support musicians beside him instead of devoting his devotion to the leads.  Over and over you’ll see the drummer and the bassist getting distracted and locking in rhythm together, somehow expecting the out of time lead guitarist to adjust to them, instead of them focusing and setting their tempo to match his supernatural “feel”.  Notice with a flat front the seems are all bunched on the sides reducing this likely hood.

If interested in this particular example you can go to http://www.churchproduction.com/story/main/howd_they_do_that_grace_church_minooka_ill for a detailed article.

Share with your drummer:

Drum Shield Facebook

You can now like DrummersBehindGlass.com on facebook.  And share even with your non drummer friends.

 

This entry was posted in Drum Shield, Fancy, High Tech, Roof. Bookmark the permalink.